Ki Ora — a Maori hello, be well, and thank you!

Flowers at the Lindt Cafe

Flowers at the Lindt Cafe

I am one lucky rabbi. For Chanukah this year I got a (mostly) all-expense paid trip for me AND Chaim to the Antipodes (a term my British friend Mark taught me, referring to Australia and New Zealand for those of us in the Northern Hemisphere) to serve as the rabbi on a 2-week cruise from Sydney to New Zealand. Somehow these cruise lines think Chanukah is up there on the list of most-important Jewish holidays! I served on this very same ship (Holland America’s Oosterdam) two years ago for Rosh Hashanah.

In my Sydney wanderings, I chanced upon the amazing flower memorial in front of the Lindt Cafe only days after that horrific hostage siege which left two innocent people dead along with the hostage-taker. From across the street, it looked like a flower market, and I went to admire the display, not even knowing until I was right in front, what it actually was. So many people came with flowers  to add to the memorial even while I was standing there.

I was delighted to see the famous Sydney Opera House “live,” after admiring its iconic shape from afar for so many years. It sits right next to the Royal Botanic Gardens, which gave me hours of walking pleasure, as well.

Sydney Opera House and me!

Sydney Opera House and me!

We left Sydney on Friday afternoon only a couple of hours before I was “on” for my first service. My on-board congregation of about 40+ Jews is quite international. There are Aussies, Brits, Algerians, Swiss, French, Tunisians, Americans, Canadians, and one American who works for the State Department in Indonesia. We are having a great time.

Milford Sound, Fjordland National Park

Milford Sound, Fjordland National Park

After being at sea for 2-1/2 days without spotting land, we reached Fjordland National Park, cruising through three beautiful fjords. Our Maori friends onboard (a cultural-educational troupe called Te Kapu) performed  a welcome-to-the-land ceremony to celebrate our official arrival to New Zealand, though we didn’t disembark. They have offered a number of fascinating workshops onboard. Klutzy me has mastered a hand-eye coordination game called titi-torea in which I threw two short sticks in quick succession to my partner to catch while she threw two back at me (which I caught!). We actually mastered several lengthy volleys with different rhythms, and I believe this will be a hard-to-beat highlight of the cruise for me, seeing as it causes me to totally revise a hardwired (and obviously incorrect) notion of myself.

I have invited our Maori friends for a Jewish-Maori dialogue tonight to celebrate our 8th night of Chanukah. I believe we share much — issues of assimilation, loss of mother-tongue, connection to homeland, connection to the earth. Sundown here is long past 9PM, so the light-in-the-darkness theme we northern folks emphasize doesn’t fly the same way with the Aussies. It’s been an edifying trip thus far on many fronts.

Sophie , my titi torea partner, and the Maori "warriors" who taught us

Sophie , my titi torea partner, and the Maori “warriors” who taught us

Dusky Sound, Fjordland National Park

Dusky Sound, Fjordland National Park

Today, day 4 of the cruise, we got our land legs back in Dunedin. Chaim and I walked to see the old synagogue in town and then the new one (nondescript, almost invisible, with a small sign only in Hebrew with its name, Beit Yisrael). And then we walked some more, to the north of the city,  to Woodlaugh gardens and then to the oldest botanic gardens in New Zealand (opened only days before the botanic gardens in Christchurch). And then we walked back and visited the Flemish Renaissance-style railway station. I had no time to shop!

Back in our room in time for “take-off,” I just got a call from the events manager who manages my schedule. She had forgotten to tell me that tomorrow night on Christmas eve, they have prepared a Jewish movie night and Chinese buffet for us! Amazing.

Happy Chanukah to those celebrating Chanukah, and Merry Christmas to those celebrating Christmas!

Chaim in the Dunedin Botanic Gardens

Chaim in the Dunedin Botanic Gardens

Dunedin Botanic Gardens

Dunedin Botanic Gardens

Dunedin Railway Station

Dunedin Railway Station

 

 

 

 

 

 

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8 thoughts on “Ki Ora — a Maori hello, be well, and thank you!

  1. Happy Chanukah, Pam! Looks like you & Chaim are having a fantastic time!!!
    It’s always good to read your interesting posts… & thanks also for the name drop!
    Enjoy yourselves!!! (I’ll write back properly, later, but have to go out now).
    Hugs & best wishes from Leeds, England X

  2. Dear Pam (and Chaim) – Happy Eighth Day of Hanukkah. What a great trip! Well-deserved.
    Your titi-torea experience sounds similar to a song/stick game I learned in Girl Scout camp (age 8!); I didn’t know the song was Maori until I heard it when I visited NZ many years ago; “Ma Koa Kotana, Wei Koitana” (with apologies for attempted spelling; maybe you can check it while on board?). We would sing the song and throw first one stick from each hand to the opposite hand, then repeat one stick cross handed, then both sticks at the same time, if we got good enough! Thanks for the memory, and I will look forward to playing with you on your return! Much Love and Light, B’chesed.

  3. Wonderful to hear from you. Sounds like a great trip & might induce me to do the same. Can’t wait to hear more. YOu’re 8th day is gone, but ours is still happening. Happy Secular New Year in the meantime. Hugs, Judith

  4. Pam–it sounds like an amazing trip! The pictures are great. I live that even in Nee Zealand you are eating Chinese food with other Jews on Christmas!! Xo

    Sent from my iPhone

  5. How wonderful!! Thanks so much for Sharing! Enjoy ❤️❤️sending love free m Florida!

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  6. Hi Pam! You are amazing! What an experience! How lucky this group is to have you. Enjoy every minute. Happy last night of Hanukkah . Best to Chaim. Xo Love, Roberta

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